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is important to us and we are ready and we count on the relationship that we have with cal fire. in fact, that's probably the most essential part of this thing for us to be ready to fight future fires. >> colonel. >> thank you very much for allowing us to come here and participate because it is important. we really appreciate very much this opportunity. we're doing well right now but there's khal lefrpgs we can do better on and that's exactly what we're looking forward to do. we're looking forward to build upon and leverage what we're doing here. communications, that was one of the first things. it's different with our active duty forces because you see here, we send our aircraft all around the world. we can't necessarily just invest in some components in the aircraft and call it good because those assets may be gone and deployed but we have work arounds for that. we are looking forward to that as well in addition to the training. lastly is we again kind of relish the opportunity to participate in the operations against an active enemy. at least here, it's fire. we appreciate the fact w
share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina o
, it was a little bit different for us as far as what happened there. like cal fire wants to, just like we all do, is aggressively attack things. but we have the applicable policies and orders that really regulate us a little bit because it's got to meet certain thresholds and sometimes like in this last one, it was a remote fire, very small, but it didn't meet some of the thresholds initially but we postured and as soon as it crossed the line they were ready to attack it aggressively. those are challenges we have to work with as well but we're ready to provide that immediate response when necessary. >> we talked a little bit so far about training exercises but maybe from the navy perspective, the marine perspective, the national guard, what training exercises are you doing right now to integrate with cal fire or other local governments to make sure that we're ready for this fire season? >> well, as far as i expressed earlier, we have the springtime exercise. that was our fifth annual one. we will obviously continue that through. just like we were speaking about yesterday, maturing the proces
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
's a technical term and it's used in a lot of different ways, but this is organic sewage sludge. basically what it is is, oh, maybe things that come out of your garbage disposal, things that are fecal in nature. it's sludge left in the water after the primary treatment, then we blend those two over and send them over to digestion. this building is built to replace tanks here that were so odoriferous they would curl your hair. we built this as an interim process. >> is there a coagulant introduced somewhere in the middle of this? . >> this coagulant brings solids together and lets the water run through. that gives us more time in the digestion process, more time to reduce the amount of solids. these are the biggest ones in the world, like we always like to do in san francisco. they are 4 meter, there's none like it in the world. >> really? wow. >> three meters, usually. we got the biggest, if not the best. so here we are. look at that baby hum. river of sludge. >> one of the things is we use bacteria that's common in our own guts to create this reduction. it's like an extra digestion. one of the
, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football, frisbee, and picnics. it is very much a couple's part and there are a multitude of experiences you can have together. bring your dog and watch the mean go with the community or just picnic at o
command air control. those are operations that are familiar to us and they are, it's a great exercise for us tactically as well. we are able to integrate with cal fire itself with the objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation manage
then became our secretary of defense. and many of us that have served thought that he was one of the best secretary of defenses we've ever had. he's currently a senior fellow at the hoover institute and a freeman foley institute of international studies. he is the michael and barbara bavarian professor at stanford university and serves as co-director of the nuclear risk reduction initiative and preventive defense project. please help me welcome our speaker this morning, former secretary of defense william perry. (applause) >> what a pleasure it is to be aboard this symbol of america's millery power, the uss macon island. what a pleasure it is to be among the men and women of our armed forces and the men and women of the first responders of the san francisco bay area. fleet week for many years in san francisco was a somewhat [inaudible] affair and it has been transformed into this great coming together by the military and the first responders, the great coming together of our uniformed personnel and a great [speaker not understood] of san francisco. this amazing transformation in the last
the establishment of the dual status commander helps us pull title 10 and title 32 forces together in a more synchronized dod response. the new attention and focus by dod is only part of the puzzle, though. dod success in helping in response to a disaster will ultimately be determined by civil authorities and their ability to properly plan their initial response and then the means by which dod capabilities are requested and properly employed. we know dod is in support of civil authorities and the real burden to that effective support is going to be sound planning to ensure we're properly directed and we can best benefit or provide benefit to the need of the place where we're supporting. the guidance now being given will drive training and exercises. and recognition of our effectiveness at providing relief for our fellow citizens does require preparation. vice admiral beeman spoke emphatickly of readiness yesterday. readiness is no accident but is a deliberate outcome of focus and hard work. dod is now stepping up to the plate in a very formal and direct way but this will only w
charlie. the previous day general hughes had briefed us that the chinese military were to begin extensive military maneuvers in the taiwan strait. this morning we were stunned to learn that they had fired two missiles that landed just 10 miles off the coast of taiwan. the taiwanese had a presidential election underway, and the chinese were using a not too subtle way of explaining to them what they wanted the outcome of that election to be. thises was an unacceptable form of military coercion and both the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the wor
in the event of a complex catastrophe, so that is a little bit different for us. there has been movement within dod and we have grown and matured certainly our presence in the fema regions has expanded, new capabilities have been delivered to the states, and we have developed the much more responsive and functional command structure, i believe, with the dual status commander and that's somebody who can bridge national guard and active or federalized forces as they flow into a disaster response. but more recently the secretary of defense has elevated this and defense support to civil authorities has been dregted -- directed into the departments to start developing plans and policies that will adjust how we respond. so we're seeing a directive that will make things more expensive and specific in defense for civil authorities and this is the most significant move in dsca that i have seen in my career. since late november, 2011, comprehensive planning meetings have taken place to analyze the issues surrounding dsca and have provided a laundry list for recommendations of actions to be taken. the d
be a good idea for us to hear about the operations that the chilean navy had undertaken for helping out their citizens. we have a panel here today, we actually have two panels we're going to roll through. one is stories from the field, if you will, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in th
believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years, obviously we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offe
to keep the ball moving forward. we can't -- i think most of us all here would agree, we really can't prevent the next disaster from happening. but by building the partnerships that we are here today and will continue to build in the future, we can certainly limit the number of deaths and long-term destruction. we can surge a lot of things: resources, people. but we cannot surge trust. so venues such as this is what helps us build that trust so that when the bell does go off we know -- a comment i made yesterday and i'd like to use it again in closing today, the most important thing for me to come out of this two-day seminar and sbat -- into the future is the ability for us to physically face to face look each other in the eye, shake hands and say to each other, we are in this together. thank you, ladies and gentlemen. . (applause). >> thank you, admiral beeman. you have helped me carry out one of the instructions secretary schultz gave to me 3 years ago, bring the fleet back to fleet week. we couldn't do it without you. i thank secretary and mrs. perry for coming, just -- i k
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)